My Blog

Posts for tag: Foot Injuries

By Dr. Howard Schaengold
March 20, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Foot Injuries  

An unexpected fall or twist can result in an injury of the foot or ankle, such as a sprain or strain. Immediate first aid can help prevent complications, reduce pain and improve recovery.

Rest, ice, compression and elevation--commonly referred to as R.I.C.E.--is the first and best treatment for minor injuries. The following tips can aid in the early treatment of common foot and ankle injuries to help reduce swelling and control the inflammatory process during the initial phase of injury.

Rest: Whether you have a strain or a sprain, rest from any physical activity is essential to protecting your injured ligaments, tendons or muscles from further damage while your body starts the repair process.  Avoid putting weight on the injured foot or ankle as much as possible. In some cases, complete immobilization may be required.

Ice: Gently ice your foot or ankle with ice wrapped in a towel in a 20-minute-on, 40-minute-off cycle for the first few days post-injury. Ice is excellent at reducing inflammation and pain. 

Compression: Applying some type of compressive wrap or bandage to an injured area can greatly reduce the amount of initial swelling.

Elevation: Prop your foot up while lying down or sitting so that it is higher than or equal to the level of the heart.

After a few days of R.I.C.E., many acute injuries will begin to heal. If pain or swelling does not subside after a few days, or if you are unsure of the severity of your injury, make an appointment with your podiatrist. A skilled podiatrist can properly diagnose your injury and recommend the best course of treatment.

By Howard Schaengold, DPM
November 15, 2012
Category: Shoes

Bare FeetSince your feet bare the brunt of your weight, it is important to take extra precautions while working to protect your feet from harm.  When your job requires you to stand on your feet for a long period of time, work in potentially hazardous areas, or with potentially hazardous materials, you have some risk of foot injury.  Productive workers depend on their ability to walk and move about safely, with ease and comfort.  According to the National Safety Council, there are about 120,000 job-related foot injuries in any given year, with one-third of them being toe injuries.

Follow Proper Guidelines

While you are off the job, there are a few steps you can take to protect your feet, including:
 
On the other hand, when you are working it is important to follow the following:
  • Develop safe work habits and attitudes
  • Be aware of the hazards of your job
  • Practice proper measures 
  • Be alert and watch for hidden hazards
  • Watch out for other workers’ safety
  • Follow the rule and don’t cut corners

Wear Protective Footwear

Safety shoes were created to protect your feet, help prevent injuries to them, and to reduce the severity of your injuries should one occur while at work.  According to the National Safety Council, it is estimated that only one out of four victims of job-related foot injury wear any type of safety shoe or boot.  Your feet are the most valuable part of your body and are constantly subjected to injury in the work place.  With many potential work hazards, it is important that you discuss with your supervisor the safety shoe, boot, or other protective equipment that you need for your protection.
 
Your Sammamish is specially trained in the diagnosis and treatment of all manners of foot conditions. Visit Howard Schaengold, DPM if you experience any work injury or if you have any further questions on how to properly care for your feet. 
By Howard Schaengold, DPM
December 15, 2011
Category: Foot Care

Stress FracturesStress fractures are notoriously misdiagnosed and under treated. In many cases, symptoms may persist for an extended period of time before the diagnosis of a stress fracture is even made. That’s because stress fractures don’t typically occur from an unforeseen trauma, as with a sprain, but rather from repetitive stress.

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline breaks in the bones. They can occur in any bone, but most often afflict the weight-bearing bones of the lower leg and foot. Athletes are especially susceptible to stress fractures, as this common injury is often a problem of overuse.  It frequently results from overtraining and high impact sports, such as running, basketball and tennis.  People with abnormal foot structure or insufficient bone may also be more vulnerable to suffer a stress fracture.

Pain is the primary symptom of a stress fracture. In the early stages, the pain may begin toward the end of an activity and resolve with rest. Untreated, the pain will eventually become persistent with minimal activity.

The most common symptoms of stress fractures include:

  • Pain with or following normal activity
  • Pain at the site of the fracture
  • Tenderness and swelling at a point on the bone
  • Pain intensified with weight bearing

Rest, ice, compression and elevation are recommended as an initial treatment plan for stress fractures. You should also minimize all weight bearing activities until you have fully recovered. Other treatments may include immobilization of the foot, footwear modifications, orthotic devices and in some severe cases, surgery. Rest is the key to a full recovery, and returning too quickly to normal activity may result in more serious damage.

Overuse injuries and stress fractures aren’t completely unavoidable, but you can take extra care to help prevent stress fractures from occurring. Remember to increase any activity or training program slowly and gradually.  Wear supportive footwear with good cushioning to help manage the forces placed on your feet and legs during high impact activities.   If pain or swelling returns, stop the activity and rest for a few days.

Stress fractures come on gradually and may not present obvious symptoms at first, so it’s important to recognize the early warning signs to prevent further damage.  If you suspect a stress fracture, contact our Sammamish office right away for an evaluation. Proper diagnosis is essential to prevent further damage and improve recovery time as stress fractures tend to get worse and may even lead to a complete break if not treated right away. A podiatrist will examine your foot or ankle, take an x-ray to determine if there is a break or crack in the bone, and recommend an appropriate treatment plan for optimal recovery.