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Posts for tag: Stress Fractures

By Howard Schaengold, DPM
December 03, 2012
Category: Foot Care
Broken LegWhen people think of osteoporosis we may think of it in relation to the spine and hips—quite possibly the wrists and ribs, as well.  However, osteoporosis can also affect your feet.  In fact, seemingly unexplained foot fractures may be an early indication that you have osteoporosis.  
 
Osteoporosis means, “porous bones,” or that they are losing their density—making your bones thinner and easily breakable.  Foot fractures from osteoporosis can come in the form of stress fractures, which are tiny fractures that cause small cracks in your feet. Because of the lack of structure to the bones, they become weak, which can lead to fractures.  
 
In the advanced stages, fractures can happen from a simple thing like getting out of bed in the morning.  These fractures can occur anywhere, but most commonly occur in the neck, low back, hip, wrists and feet.  For the feet, these fractures often occur with repetitive small trauma due to wearing a unsupportive shoes, such as flip-flops.  With the loss of structure comes the collapse of joints in the feet, which can cause arthritis and pain.  Fractures in the feet from osteoporosis can range from small stresses in the bone to large displaced breaks that require surgery. However, surgery for osteoporotic patients can be a challenge.  
 
The sooner you deal with stress fractures the better.  If you have pain in your feet that seems beyond any normal kind of soreness, you should visit your podiatrist in Sammamish for further diagnosis and treatment.  
 

What do I do?

The general advice for aging people is to make sure you have enough calcium and vitamin D in your diet.  Exercise is also vital for increasing bone strength and to protect you against these painful fractures.  Any type of activities in which you move is good—walking, running, swimming, dancing and even bowling can be just what you need to strengthen your bones.  If you have foot issues and are unsure of how much your feet can take, talk to your podiatrist at Plateau Foot & Ankle Clinic.  
 
Be sure to choose shoes that offer proper support to your feet and ankles, as well.  Your podiatrist in Sammamish might recommend orthotics to give you that extra support to your arches.  Even if your bones are not affected by osteoporosis, orthotics can still help you by providing extra stability that may save you from a fall that could break other bones.  
 
Your feet play an important role in making aging easy and less painful.  Avoid dangers of osteoporosis by taking care of your overall health and paying attention to your feet! If you have any foot problems or pain, contact Howard Schaengold, DPM for proper diagnosis and treatment. 

Heel pain is one of the leading problems that cause patients to visit their podiatrist, and it’s no wonder. The relentless ache in the bottom of your foot or the sharp pain as you step out of bed in the morning is often enough to persuade even the most stubborn patient to make an appointment with his or her podiatrist.

Because there are many potential causes of heel pain, such as a stress fracture, tendonitis, nerve damage or arthritis, it’s important to have your foot examined by a podiatrist with expert training in heel pain. Howard Schaengold, DPM will examine your foot, determine the underlying source of your heel pain, assess your symptoms, make a proper diagnosis and recommend a treatment plan based on your individual case. Early diagnosis and treatment can help prevent more serious problems.

Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain, occurring when the thick band of tissue (plantar fascia) that connects the heel to the toes becomes irritated and inflamed. When the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension, tissues of the fascia may tear or stretch, which leads to pain.

Faulty foot structures, such as flat feet or high arches are common causes of plantar fasciitis. Non-supportive shoes and increased weight or strain may aggravate the condition as well.

Common symptoms of plantar fasciitis include:

  • Bottom of the heel pain
  • Pain that intensifies after sitting for extended periods of time and subsides after a few minutes of walking
  • Pain that worsens over a period of months

Most types of heel pain, once properly diagnosed, can be successfully treated with conservative measures, such as use of anti-inflammatory medications and ice, rest, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, footwear modifications, and physical therapy. The longer heel pain is allowed to progress, the longer treatment can take. When plantar fasciitis doesn’t respond to conservative care, your podiatrist may recommend surgery as a last resort.  Always seek care from our Sammamish office for heel pain in its earliest stages for proper treatment.

By Howard Schaengold, DPM
December 15, 2011
Category: Foot Care

Stress FracturesStress fractures are notoriously misdiagnosed and under treated. In many cases, symptoms may persist for an extended period of time before the diagnosis of a stress fracture is even made. That’s because stress fractures don’t typically occur from an unforeseen trauma, as with a sprain, but rather from repetitive stress.

Stress fractures are tiny, hairline breaks in the bones. They can occur in any bone, but most often afflict the weight-bearing bones of the lower leg and foot. Athletes are especially susceptible to stress fractures, as this common injury is often a problem of overuse.  It frequently results from overtraining and high impact sports, such as running, basketball and tennis.  People with abnormal foot structure or insufficient bone may also be more vulnerable to suffer a stress fracture.

Pain is the primary symptom of a stress fracture. In the early stages, the pain may begin toward the end of an activity and resolve with rest. Untreated, the pain will eventually become persistent with minimal activity.

The most common symptoms of stress fractures include:

  • Pain with or following normal activity
  • Pain at the site of the fracture
  • Tenderness and swelling at a point on the bone
  • Pain intensified with weight bearing

Rest, ice, compression and elevation are recommended as an initial treatment plan for stress fractures. You should also minimize all weight bearing activities until you have fully recovered. Other treatments may include immobilization of the foot, footwear modifications, orthotic devices and in some severe cases, surgery. Rest is the key to a full recovery, and returning too quickly to normal activity may result in more serious damage.

Overuse injuries and stress fractures aren’t completely unavoidable, but you can take extra care to help prevent stress fractures from occurring. Remember to increase any activity or training program slowly and gradually.  Wear supportive footwear with good cushioning to help manage the forces placed on your feet and legs during high impact activities.   If pain or swelling returns, stop the activity and rest for a few days.

Stress fractures come on gradually and may not present obvious symptoms at first, so it’s important to recognize the early warning signs to prevent further damage.  If you suspect a stress fracture, contact our Sammamish office right away for an evaluation. Proper diagnosis is essential to prevent further damage and improve recovery time as stress fractures tend to get worse and may even lead to a complete break if not treated right away. A podiatrist will examine your foot or ankle, take an x-ray to determine if there is a break or crack in the bone, and recommend an appropriate treatment plan for optimal recovery.