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Posts for tag: corns

By Howard Schaengold, DPM
February 19, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: corns  

Many people think corns and calluses are the same thing, but there are differences. A corn is smaller than a callus, and has a hard center which is surrounded by inflamed tissue. Unlike calluses, corns can be painful and make it difficult to wear shoes. The good news is, your podiatrist can help get rid of corns and get you back on your feet.

Corns typically develop to protect your feet and toes from friction and pressure. They can be found in both weight bearing and non-weight bearing areas including between your toes, and on the tops and sides of your toes.

According to the Mayo Clinic, common signs and symptoms of a corn include:

  • A thick, rough area of skin
  • A hardened, raised bump
  • Tenderness or pain under the skin

Since corns are caused by friction and pressure, you can do a lot to prevent corn development. Remember to:

  • Wear shoes with plenty of room for your toes
  • Use padding or bandages in your shoes
  • Soak your feet in warm water to soften corns
  • After soaking, rub the corn with a pumice stone to remove hardened skin
  • Moisturize your feet every day to keep your skin soft

If you have diabetes and you develop a corn or other foot problem, you need the help of an expert, your podiatrist. Self-treating foot issues when you are diabetic can lead to injuries that don’t heal and could get worse, resulting in a serious infection.

Fortunately, your podiatrist can recommend several treatment options to get rid of corns, including:

  • Trimming away excess skin to reduce friction
  • Corn-removing medication containing salicylic acid
  • Custom-fit inserts or orthotics
  • Surgery if the corn is caused from friction due to poor bone alignment

You don’t have to deal with painful corns by yourself. Get some relief from the pain by visiting your podiatrist. Your feet are important, so seek out the best care possible to protect your feet.

By Dr. Howard Schaengold
September 27, 2017
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Calluses   corns  

Corns and calluses are thick, hardened areas of skin that develop in response to your body's natural defense to repeated pressure or friction. While neither condition presents a long-term or serious health risk, they can be painful, irritating and unattractive.

Identifying a Corn or Callus

Corns and calluses are similar in nature, but differ in size and location. Corns are smaller than calluses and usually have a hard, thickened center surrounded by red, inflamed skin. They typically develop on the tops and sides of your toes and can be painful when touched. Calluses generally develop on your heels and balls of your feet. They vary in size and shape, although almost always larger than corns.

For most people who develop calluses or corns, eliminating the source of pressure is usually enough to make the thickened skin disappear. We recommend the following for treating corns and calluses:

  • Wear comfortable shoes and socks. When footwear fits properly, there is less opportunity for friction and rubbing to occur.
  • Soak your feet in warm, soapy water to help remove corns and calluses. Rub the thickened skin with a pumice stone to remove toughened layers more easily.
  • Keeping your feet moisturized with foot cream or lotion will help improve the quality of your skin and rid your feet from calluses or corns.

When to Seek Care

When corns and calluses don't respond to conservative care, contact our office for a careful evaluation. We can investigate the possible causes of your corn or callus, safely remove the thick, hardened area of skin, and recommend appropriate footwear and treatment, including padding and inserts. Never attempt to cut away a corn or callus on your own, especially if you have diabetes or poor circulation. Instead, seek advice for careful removal and proper care.

By Dr. Howard Schaengold
April 03, 2014
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Calluses   proper shoes   corns  

With warmer weather on the way, you may be consigning your boots to the back of your closet, and readying space for lighter spring shoes. If a shopping trip to check out the new spring styles is in your plans this week, don’t forget that your feet may be tender after a winter of being enclosed in socks and shoes. Finding a new pair that fits well can help prevent corns and calluses from forming as you transition to sandals and barefoot styles that don’t protect your feet as well.

Shoes are the major source of the friction that causes hard calluses to build up on the soles of your feet, or corns to form where your bones rub against the inside. Extra dry heels can crack and split, and open shoe styles can expose them to infection as they encounter the environment. Corns can be aggravated by heels and tight shoes, and the added pressure can cause quite a bit of pain. Eliminating the friction with the right shoes reduces your risk of getting these patches of dry skin.

There are other things you can do, too, to prevent corns and calluses. Soaking your feet in warm water and then gently abrading the built up layers of skin with a pumice stone can help keep them under control. Using a good lotion or cream will also help to keep the skin softer and reduce the pressure from hard corns. Don’t underestimate the power of hydration, either. When warm weather has you perspiring more, make sure you drink enough fluids to keep your skin supple and smooth.

Don’t let corns and calluses ruin your fun this spring. For this and any other foot problem, come to the experts at The Plateau Foot & Ankle Clinic in Sammamish, WA. Call (425) 868-3338 for excellent foot care in a caring environment. We also serve the Bellevue, Issaquah, and Redmond areas, and you can request an appointment right on our website.

By Dr. Howard Schaengold
February 24, 2014
Category: Deformities

It seems NBA star LeBron James can’t go anywhere without someone taking a picture, and each one is subject to scrutiny from head to toe. So when he was snapped barefoot on a dock, columnist Matt King had a go at his “seriously messed up toes.” King seemed to think James’ overlapping toes were due to an injury, but the truth is many toe deformities are inherited.

In some people, a pinky or middle toe curls up and over another toe, and usually the condition is genetic. True, sometimes other causes like high arches or flat feet can cause a child to put weight on the foot in a different way, misplacing the pinky toe up over the next one. In adults, tight shoes that pinch the toes can cause them to move out of position. With bunions, for example, the big toe can move so far toward the second one that it overlaps it, or pushes one of the other toes out of position.

Toe deformities like these can cause pain when they rub against your shoes or each other. The irritation during movement may also bring about calluses, corns, or blisters. The abnormalities alter the way you walk or run, and even affect the bone structure in your feet. Athletes who place a lot of stress on their lower extremities may experience more severe symptoms than less active people.

What can you do for overlapping toes? Accommodate them, for a start. Make sure your shoes have enough room for the toe and don’t rub against it. Have Dr. Howard Schaengold at The Plateau Foot & Ankle Clinic take a look at them. He can recommend gel pads, taping, or toe straighteners to cushion and keep the toe in place. Taping may be helpful in infants to correct the deformity as much as possible while their bones form, although the toe may never be completely normal.

Foot deformities are one of our specialties, so call us at (425) 868-3338 for all your podiatric needs. Whether you live in Sammamish, Redmond, Issaquah or Bellevue, you can find great foot care with us!

By Howard Schaengold, DPM
August 01, 2012
Category: Foot Care

Foot PainWhether you suffer from chronic heel pain, are embarrassed by toenail fungus or were recently diagnosed with diabetes, you can benefit from visiting a professional podiatrist.

Podiatrists provide medical and surgical care for people suffering foot, ankle and lower leg problems, such as corns, warts, bunions and sprains. Common conditions, such as arthritis, diabetes and peripheral arterial disease, which can damage the feet, can also be diagnosed and treated by a podiatrist. Even back pain can be traced to your feet and relieved through proper evaluation and treatment by a skilled foot specialist.

Not all foot and ankle problems warrant an appointment with a podiatrist. In some cases, rest, ice or even a change in footwear is enough to reduce the pain and get you back on your feet. But when foot pain and discomfort cannot be resolved by home treatment, you need a professional’s care—someone who specializes in foot-related injuries and disorders.

When to Call Howard Schaengold, DPM

Feet are invariably the most ignored parts of the body. Too many people dismiss foot health until there is a serious, painful problem.Whenever a foot or ankle problem lasts for several days, contact a Sammamish podiatrist. Other signs that indicate a worsening condition and warrant medical attention, include:

  • Foot discoloration
  • Pain and swelling in one foot
  • A foot sore or wound that doesn’t heal

How often you should visit a podiatrist depends on the individual. Regular appointments can help you better understand the stresses and strains put on your feet and lower legs on a daily basis. Long-term care and prevention is also extremely important for individuals with diabetes, as podiatrists help prevent ulcerations and loss of limb with early diagnosis and care.

Remember, foot pain should never be taken lightly. Always consult Howard Schaengold, DPM for proper diagnosis of foot disorders.